Blog

Our blog is focused on the issue of pediatric feeding struggles. Feeding struggles are complex, extremely varied, and affect more than just the child. You can expect to see posts from feeding experts, parents who have walked the walk, and of course, us here at Feeding Matters.

If you have questions or concerns, please review our terms of use .

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Volunteer Spotlight: Dr. Jaime Phalen

Published by Feeding Matters on January 16, 2019

 

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Feeding Tubes for All – Advancing Feeding Tube Technology for Our Tiniest Patients

Published by Avanos on January 07, 2019

Feeding a child may seem like a simple task, but mealtimes can be challenging for parents and caregivers whose children are living with serious medical conditions. Tube feeding is a necessary alternative for children who are unable to ingest food orally due to a chronic illness.

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Feeding Matters’ 6th International Pediatric Feeding Disorder Conference: The Difference

Published by Feeding Matters on January 02, 2019

Our feeding community has a multitude of options when it comes to continuing education and professional and personal outreach.  You may attend in-person workshops, view webinars, participate in chats, or peruse an article.  So why should you attend Feeding Matters’ 6th Annual IPFDC? 

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What to Expect in 2019

Published by Feeding Matters on December 31, 2018

2018 was an exciting year of growth for Feeding Matters and the pediatric feeding community. From welcoming new team members to our Feeding Matters’ family to expanding our partnerships and donations received, we were constantly moving to further advances for pediatric feeding disorder (PFD).

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Introducing PFD Alliance

Published by Feeding Matters on December 17, 2018

The world of pediatric feeding disorder (PFD) is changing. With the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition accepting "Pediatric Feeding Disorder: Consensus Definition and Conceptual Framework" for publication, PFD has transitioned from being regarded as a symptom to now having its own identity and diagnosis.

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