Family Stories

My Journey with Mikarah

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I am a mother of four children. My youngest child, Mikarah, was diagnosed with feeding difficulties, better known as failure to thrive, at about 8 weeks of age. She was born at 35 weeks and it was a pretty normal pregnancy. I breastfed, but she was not gaining weight. 

 

Meet Mason

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When Mason began losing weight and showing signs that he had stopped growing at just a few months old, his doctor recommended that it was time to see a specialist. His parents were devastated to learn that their baby was failing to thrive. After doing everything they possibly could to help him, they decided it was time to have a g-tube put in. Throughout the next few years, Mason went through feeding therapy, which he successfully completed.  Mason’s mother recalls seeing a drastic change in her son, who has since recovered and now enjoys eating foods orally.

Mealtimes: No Magic Required

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When families begin the process of weaning from feeding tubes at home, a paralysis can take place, where you feel a lot of pressure to create magical mealtimes that will hypnotize your children into eating spoonful after spoonful. But when that paralysis strikes, we have good news: creating a wean-friendly meal does not require a magic touch. It only requires you to keep the following in mind:

Five Warning Signs That Your Child Is Malnourished

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Proper nutrition is vital to your child’s health, growth, and development. When your child isn’t eating or getting enough calories and the proper nutrients, there can be trouble ahead. Malnutrition weakens the immune system, opens the door to infections and delays healing. Here are five warning signs that you should look for in your children. If you spot any of them, talk with a healthcare professional about your concerns.

School-Based Accommodations & Supports

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Children with pediatric feeding disorder have diverse needs ranging from refusals to eat specific textures to an inability to chew and swallow that necessitates medical interventions such as tube feedings (Berlin, Davies, Lobato, & Silverman, 2009). Many underlying medical or developmental problems may contribute to difficulties with eating. Regardless of a child’s medical status or developmental course, inadequate nutrition or hydration may contribute to learning difficulties in school including, but certainly not limited to:

Meet Noah

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Born at 3 pounds, 8 ounces, little Noah immediately struggled to eat and spent the first months of his life in the NICU. His parents tried several methods of getting him to eat solid foods, but at 14 months, Noah was still only drinking formula. They felt like no one understood what they were going through and that they had run out of options. His parents, Amanda and Darin, credit Feeding Matters for supporting them and recommending the help Noah needed. Noah now sees a tongue-tie specialist and feeding therapist who have helped him immensely. 

Video Blog: Meet Hadyn

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Pediatric feeding disorder effect every area of a child’s development, including their social, emotional, physical, and mental well-being. Today, you will meet Hadyn, who was born with a chromosome disorder called 18 Q Deletion. Hadyn’s mother knew his disorder came with complications, including hearing loss, visual impairment, and developmental delays. However, she did not expect feeding Hadyn would be so difficult.

Video Blog: Meet Lucy

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At about six months old, Lucy’s parents, Garrett and Jake, decided to begin feeding her simple solid foods like rice cereal and formula. To her parent’s surprise, the first time Lucy tried solid food she screamed and resisted. The only way to calm her was to completely remove the food from her mouth. And this was just the beginning.

The Power of Two

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Parents of infants and children with pediatric feeding disorder may feel isolated and overwhelmed with the medical, emotional, financial, educational and social issues they face as they raise their child. In today’s video blog, Pinali Agrawal tells her experience with the Power of Two program. “It literally opened up a whole different world to me. I had been searching for such a long time, since my son was born, to try to find a group,” Pinali describes. “I was so thankful to find Feeding Matters and the Power of Two.”

Congenital Heart Disease + Pediatric Feeding Disorders

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For February, a time known for American Heart Month, National Wear Red day, and Valentine’s Day, Feeding Matters welcomes guest contributor Renee Bergeron, author of Little Earthling Blog. A mom of 14, Renee always dreamed of a peaceful home full of little feet, days spent on a lovely piece of property with a lush organic garden to supply our family’s needs. Instead, she “ended up with real, live children who often interrupt me, a black thumb and hunk of property that no one has time to keep up with.”