PFD Alliance Membership is free and open to anyone with a passion for pediatric feeding disorder.

Once you become a PFD Alliance member, you are automatically placed into the education, advocacy, or research pillars based on the preferences you identified.  Pillars meet twice per year to discuss the strategic goals of those pillars.  Committees within the three respective pillars carry out the work identified by the entire pillar membership.

Calls to serve for leadership opportunities and specific committees are issued once per year or as identified by the Executive Council. Member enrollment for pillar participation remains open year round.

COMMITMENT FOR BECOMING A PFD ALLIANCE MEMBER:

Commitment for becoming a PFD Alliance Member:

  • stay up to date on Feeding Matters and the efforts to advance the field through education, advocacy, and research

  • participate in pillar-specific town halls (held annually during the summer)

  • contribute to pillar-specific symposiums during the annual International Pediatric Feeding Disorder Conference

  • provide ideas and feedback through the various mechanisms requested by the education, advocacy, or research pillar chair (typically through online surveys)

PFD ALLIANCE MEMBERS AGREE THAT:

PFD ALLIANCE MEMBERS AGREE THAT:

  • Families/caregivers are an equal and valued member of the treatment team and should be respected in this way.

  • The domains represented in the evaluation of PFD must include: medical, nutrition, psychosocial, and feeding skill.

  • There are no identified longitudinal, evidence-based best practices for intervention. This is due to the lack of longitudinal information available in the current research, and the heterogeneous nature of the population of children with pediatric feeding disorder. As a result, we believe it is critical that:

    – A family’s definition of success be incorporated into treatment planning

    – Treatment philosophies may not be equally appropriate for all children; and

    – Families should be well informed about all existing services.

  • Multiple perspectives are necessary to create a functional system of care. This includes not only families and healthcare professionals but also partners who represent insurance companies, academia, public health, legislators, among others.